Recent Posts

Shooting great after the lesson … or not

Author: Gil Ash
Posted on May 7, 2014

However, when I go back to practice or especially when I shoot a tournament, I promptly forget all of your teaching and revert to my bad habits. What accounts for this phenomenon? Is it the stress of competition or do I need more practice?The answer is a combination of yes– it is stress of competition and yes you need more practice. You have only been shooting for 5 months and the data bank in you mind is not there yet... Read more…

Practive routine

Author: Gil Ash
Posted on May 7, 2014

We have begun asking people how they go about practicing with their shotguns. Most people practice by going out and shooting their home course. They don’t try to isolate their problems, they will instead just shoot each stand and gauge their success on how well they shot by their score. Practice is an important part of your game plan. Each time you go to practice, have a specific goal. Such as, today I will practice on... Read more…

Smooth It Out

Author: Gil Ash
Posted on May 7, 2014

We were out early one morning doing our 3 mile walk on the golf course when we were surprised by two foursomes of golfers.  It so happens that we were walking toward them so each time they were ready to address and hit the ball, we took cover behind a tree.  We would have been much safer if we were standing by the pin on the green but that would have been rude.  As we observed each golfer something very obvious came to... Read more…

The Differences between Practice and Training

Author: Gil Ash
Posted on May 7, 2014

You are all familiar with the phrase practice makes perfect.  We find that practice makes permanent and perfect practice makes perfect.  To say it another way how you practice is more important than how much you practice.  In our experience we find that people confuse practice with playing the game.  Practicing incorrectly creates more problems for shooters than they realize both mentally and physically.  Sound like we... Read more…

Controlling the future

Author: Gil Ash
Posted on May 7, 2014

The more we study and teach the mental side of performance, the more it becomes obvious to us that our students are their own worst enemy. They create under performance as a result of their negative thoughts, actions, and emotions.Throwing shells, slamming the gun shut, grimacing. These outbursts over missed targets simply serve as reminders to the subconscious that you desire missing. The ever expanding list of excuse... Read more…